General

Border collie and cats

Border collie and cats



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Border collie and cats (including Maine coon, British shorthair and Norwegian forest cats) should be encouraged to have free access to the outdoors.

They are not necessarily "fearless" (some breeds are), but have a good sense of smell, and can hunt well.

A cat with the correct temperament will learn to avoid danger (i.e. fire, poisonous plants, dangerous birds, etc.)

This is particularly the case if the cat is "domesticated" to a great extent.

Cat's are not the only prey animals that can be dangerous to humans. A dog or other domestic animal can bite, but a cat can scratch or claw and have enough claws to injure a person's hands or face, or even cause death.

They are also excellent sentry animals (although they can get "hyper") to warn you if someone is breaking in, or to give you warning of a fire, or other hazard.

A cat will usually not attack a human unless it is a "feral cat" and hungry.

Cats, like dogs, have a natural instinct to hunt.

There is a difference between a feral cat and a pet cat.

The wild cat does not come into the house for food, and is not "cared for" by the owner.

The domestic cat does come into the house for food, and is usually "cared for" by the owner.

It has been estimated that in the United States there are approximately 40 million cats (25 million indoor cats).

There are approximately 12 million cats killed annually in the US.

Cats are a significant portion of the wildlife in the United States, and kill between 1.7 and 4.4 million birds, and a similar number of rodents and insects.

This is important because a significant portion of the prey that cats kill is insects which are food for many birds, rodents and other animals.

The majority of cats in North America are indoor cats, and are killed mainly by starvation.

The most common cause of death for a cat in the US is accidental poisoning by rodenticide.

There are estimated to be about 1.5 million domestic cats in the UK, a figure similar to the US.

In the UK, the average lifespan of a pet cat is about seven years (as compared to the average of about eight years in the US).

The British government estimated that in 2005 there were an estimated 6.3 million "feral" (stray) cats in the UK, a figure which has been steadily increasing over the last few years.

The "mortality" of pet cats, including euthanasia, is estimated to be similar to that of pet dogs, and about 3% (for example, 15,000) die of natural causes per year.

In the UK, there are about 100 deaths annually (as compared to an estimated total of about 10,000 deaths in the US per year).

Although cats do have a natural instinct to hunt, in the wild this instinct is suppressed or controlled by the domesticated cat's owner.

In the wild, cats do not hunt birds.

Cats do not normally hunt small mammals and insects.

Most wild cats do not attack a human unless they are "scared".

This does not mean that the wild cats are completely harmless, and they are a natural predator of many birds, insects and other animals.

In the US, there are approximately 6.8 million pet cats, which eat up to 7 million insects and birds per year.

The most common cause of death for a cat in the US is accidental poisoning by rodenticide.

In the UK, cats are responsible for about a third of house-bound wildlife mortality, including about a million birds, about 10,000 molluscs, about a hundred invertebrates, and about 10,000 arachnids and other animals.

In the UK, cats are responsible for about a third of house-bound wildlife mortality, including about a million birds, about 10,000 molluscs, about a hundred invertebrates, and about 10,000 arachnids and other animals.

The domestic cat is estimated to be responsible for killing between 1.4 and 2.7 billion birds per year in the United States.

The domestic cat is estimated to be responsible for killing between 1.4 and 2.7 billion birds per year in the United States.

Cats can live to over 15 years of age.

Most domestic cats are under four years of age, and live for about 8-10 years (compared to about 13-15 years in the wild).

There are also estimated to be about 1.3 million domestic cats in the UK, about two-thirds of whom live in households.

There are approximately 2 million feral cats in the UK.

In the UK, about one-third of all reported cat related injuries to children involve cats that are free-roaming and not domesticated.

In the US, it is estimated that there are about 50 million pet cats.

The total number of cats in the world is estimated to be between 110 and 150 million.

Although most domestic cats are owned by people, they are not owned by one person.


Watch the video: Border Collies and Cats (August 2022).